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101 Best Restaurants in America for 2017

101 Best Restaurants in America for 2017


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This is the 2017 ranking of the 101 Best Restaurants in America. For the most recent ranking, please click here.

What makes a good restaurant a "best?" Food that's better than just good, of course. A dining room and a level of service that suit the quality of what's on the plate. A good wine list (which doesn't always mean an encyclopedic one), good beers and/or cocktails where appropriate. And then the less easily quantifiable stuff: personality, imagination (or intelligent commitment to a lack of same), consistency.

101 Best Restaurants in America (Slideshow)

When we were a young website, way back in 2011, we drew up our first 101 ranking ourselves, making a list of the places where we, The Daily Meal’s editors, liked to eat. Taking into consideration our mood, our budget, and where we happened to be when we get hungry, how would we vote, we asked ourselves — not only with our critical faculties but with our mouths and our wallets? Where would we send friends? Where would we want to dine if we had one night in this city or that?

By this method, we ended up with a shortlist of 150 places. Then we argued, advocated, and cajoled each other on behalf of restaurants ranging from old-fashioned to avant garde, ultra-casual to super-fancy. Finally, we invited an illustrious panel of judges (restaurant critics, food and lifestyle writers, and bloggers) from across America to help order restaurants via an anonymous survey and tallied results to assemble a ranked list.

The following year, we refined the process and made it less about our own preferences and more about those of the growing number of writers and other food-conscious folk who were contributing to the site or commenting on what other people contributed. Since 2012, then, our 101 best have been chosen by a voting pool that includes our city editors and special contributors, members of The Daily Meal Council (excluding chefs and restaurateurs), and a growing list of other panelists who have agreed to participate in the ever-increasing number of "Best" surveys we conduct.

For this year's 101, we reached out to hundreds of restaurant experts of various stripes around the country, asking them to vote on an admittedly rather long "shortlist" of nearly 700 establishments. Here are the results.The task of choosing our nation's best restaurants — as our panelists would surely tell you — becomes more difficult every year, because the number of excellent places to eat continues to grow.

The task of choosing our nation's best restaurants — as our panelists would surely tell you — becomes more difficult every year, because the number of excellent places to eat continues to grow. As our interest in, and appreciation of, good food continues to increase — as more great chefs train more younger good ones — fantastic food continues to spread across America. Exceptional culinary landscapes in big cities get better, while new and different dining scenes in every corner of the country are born, in turn attracting and inspiring more talented cooks. All this makes trying to rank the country’s best restaurants more and more challenging, but also more and more worthwhile and intriguing.

You'll find many of the expected names on this list — restaurants run by Daniel Boulud, Wolfgang Puck, José Andrés, Thomas Keller, Danny Meyer, and other luminaries of today's American restaurant scene. You'll find Italian places both unorthodox (Scampo, No. 81) and extravagant (Del Posto, No. 15). Some of the nation's most celebrated and refined Japanese restaurants are included (Masa, No. 31, and O Ya, No. 95, among others). Carnivores will delight at finding places like Peter Luger (No. 55) and Roast (No. 99), while those more piscatorially inclined will savor Pêche (No. 40) and Coi (No. 39). Our number-one choice won't surprise anybody who follows fine cooking in America; our numbers 43 or 58 might.

Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2016
Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2015
Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2014
Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2013
Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2012
Read: 101 Best Restaurants in America for 2011

As we do every year, we expect to hear complaints about this ranking, not just because any list of this kind is subjective to a degree, no matter how many experts weigh in, but also because we haven't included any of the doubtless excellent restaurants in, say, Providence, Charlotte, Cleveland, the Twin Cities, Santa Fe, Phoenix, San Diego — or any of the hundreds of smaller towns across the U.S. where good cooking is practiced and skillfully run dining rooms are pleasing devoted clienteles.

But here's the thing: There are more than 600,000 restaurants in America, counting fast-food outlets, fast casual chains, small places where the food might be fine but the amenities are slim, and places with no particular pretensions to quality at all. Bracket all these out and we've still got — what? — maybe four or five thousand places that are striving to be "best restaurants" and possibly think they already are.

Our list has room for only a tiny fraction of these, and when we reached out to our panel of some of the top restaurant critics and critical diners in America, the places they voted for — perhaps not surprisingly — tend to be concentrated in those cities that are, for reasons that are probably cultural as well as economic, our best "food towns." Chief among these are Las Vegas (four restaurants), Charleston (four restaurants), New Orleans (six restaurants), San Francisco (seven restaurants), Chicago (nine restaurants), Los Angeles (15 restaurants), and (grumble if you wish) New York City (24 restaurants). Those are the places where our panelists have found the most top restaurants because those are the places that the most talented chefs and restaurateurs from other regions gravitate to, and the places with large and enthusiastic support groups to encourage them and make them profitable. We realize that there are more than 70 urban areas in the United States with populations of 500,000 and above, all of them chockful of restaurants — but does every one of them have even a place or two that can really be compared with America’s best? Even now, probably not — though we did find top restaurants in such places as Oxford, Mississippi; Birmingham, Alabama; and Mystic, Connecticut (among other less expected destinations). And next year, who knows?

This year, in any case, we’re welcoming 15 restaurants into the fold for the first time, including relative newcomers Le Coucou (No. 43) and KYU (No. 101), as well as seven restaurants that didn't make the list last year but had been in previous years’ rankings: City Grocery, Marea, Underbelly, Bacchanalia, Coi, Herbsaint, and FIG.

If you have quarrels with our results, please let us know. In the meantime, we plan to publish a follow-up, a "reader's choice," with your opinions. If you turn us on to truly deserving places that we and our panelists somehow missed, so much the better.

We also, incidentally, plan to publish — as we have in past years — a ranking of America's 101 Best Casual Restaurants, accommodating the pizzerias and taquerías and gastropubs and such that aren't included here, but that we all love (and sometimes, frankly, prefer to the more serious places ranked here).

We’re excited about our 2017 list of America’s best restaurants (you can view the complete list on the next page, and click through the slideshow here). The sheer quality and diversity demonstrate that we truly live in an exciting time for food in America.

Additional reporting by Colman Andrews.


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com


Kemuri Tatsu-Ya

Fun. That’s the one word that defined this year’s best new restaurants. Fun food, fun vibe, fun experience. And at no place did I party more than at Kemuri Tatsu-ya in East Austin. That’s bound to happen when you combine a raucous izakaya (think Japanese pub) and a smoky Texas BBQ joint with the “keep it weird” mantra of the capital. Throw in some Nikka whiskey, pitchers of Live Oak Pilz, and shochu-and-rum-spiked Puff Puff Pass cocktails (served in a ceramic blowfish, no less) and you’ve got a seriously good time.

But don’t think for a second that’s it all sake bombs and fried food. There’s pedigree at work here: chefs Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya Matsumoto, who first won us over with steaming bowls of noodles at the nearby Ramen Tatsu-ya, a Top 50 restaurant in 2013. At Kemuri, their cooking has a fearlessness to it—it challenges expectations while delivering new and exciting flavors.

The brisket-filled Texas ramen.

I’m not going to talk you out of ordering their signature brisket-filled Texas ramen, an Austin-Tokyo mash-up that makes you wonder why someone didn’t think of it sooner. But it’s the more oddball, ambitious dishes that really show Kemuri’s penchant for playfulness. “Hot pocketz,” a kind of crispy sandwich involving fried tofu slices, gouda, and yes, more brisket, can’t possibly be delicate and nuanced, can it? Let’s just say I’m still trying to re-create them at home. Then there’s the octopus fritter topped with Texas chili that defies classification. If the sweet smell of smoke and meat isn’t enough of a clue, Kemuri is smoking all kinds of wonderful things: fish collar, barbecue eel, and duck breast. Yes, you need to order something from the Smoked section of the menu. More adventurous palates will want to gravitate to chinmi (which in Japanese translates to “rare taste”). These include shiokara (squid marinated in its own guts), crispy ray fin, and charred metaiko (salted cod roe). Clearly, this place was meant for big groups, so get the gang together and order as much of the menu as possible.

The Matcha Pain Killer combines buckwheat shochu with tequila, pineapple, coconut, and matcha tea.

Remember the Double Deuce bar in Road House where Patrick Swayze played a bouncer? Well, Kemuri kinda feels like that, but without all the fighting. It’s a lively, sometimes rowdy scene with good music and lots of Japanese and Texas knickknacks hanging from the walls. There are several bars, a screened-in patio, as well as outdoor seating—a little bit of something for every style of diner.

In a town filled with migas breakfast tacos and barbecue on every corner, Kemuri stands out for not playing it safe. Who knew that trailblazing could be this delicious—and fun.

No time for a cross-country road trip? For one night only, find all our Hot 10 chefs in one place. Join us for NYC’s biggest night in food: BAHot10.com