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Party Vegan's Porcini-stuffed Seitan with Wild Mushroom Sauce Recipe

Party Vegan's Porcini-stuffed Seitan with Wild Mushroom Sauce Recipe


Directions

For the stuffing:

Place the dried porcini in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Set aside for 20 minutes to soften.

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and celery. Cover and cook until soft, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic, mushrooms, thyme, sage, water, salt, and pepper. Cook until the mushrooms release their juices, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Drain the soaked porcini and finely chop. Stir them into the onion and mushroom mixture and transfer to a large bowl. Add the rice, bread and parsley and mix well, adding a little more water if the stuffing is too dry. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary. Refrigerate to cool completely while you make the seitan.

For the seitan:

In a food processor, combine the vital wheat gluten, yeast, porcini powder, onion powder, salt, garlic powder, and paprika. Pulse to blend. Add the water, soy sauce, and oil and process for a minute to form a soft dough. Turn the mixture out onto a lightly floured work surface and stretch it out with lightly floured hands until it is flat and about 1⁄2 inch thick. Place the flattened seitan between two sheets of plastic wrap or parchment paper. Use a rolling pin to flatten it as much as you can (it will be elastic and resistant). Top with a baking sheet weighed down with canned goods and let it rest for 10 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350˚F.

When the stuffing is completely cool, place it in the center of the seitan and use your hands to press the stuffing into a firm log. Roll the seitan up and around the stuffing, using your fingers to seal the ends and the seam. Place the seitan on a large sheet of foil and roll it up, twisting the ends to seal. Place the wrapped seitan in a deep baking pan. Pour hot water into the pan about halfway up the sides of the seitan. Cover the pan tightly with foil and bake for 40 minutes.

Lightly grease a separate large baking pan. Remove the seitan from the water and remove the foil. Place the seitan in the prepared baking pan. Rub a little oil on the top and sides of the seitan and bake until firm and glossy brown, about 20 minutes.

For the sauce:

In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallot and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms and cook 2 minutes longer. Add the thyme, broth, soy sauce, parsley, and salt and pepper, to taste. Bring to a boil. In a small bowl, combine the cornstarch and water and mix until blended. Reduce the heat to low, whisk the cornstarch mixture into the sauce, and stir until it thickens, about 3 minutes. Stir in the browning liquid. If not using right away, bring to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Remove the seitan from the oven and set aside for 10 minutes before slicing. Use a serrated knife to cut most of it into 1/2-inch slices, leaving about one-third of it whole. Arrange the seitan on a large platter and pour some of the mushroom sauce on top. Serve hot with the remaining mushroom sauce at the table.

Note: If you’re planning to make this roast ahead of time (up to a day in advance), do not slice it. Instead, let it come to room temperature after baking, then cover and refrigerate until needed. The roast will cut more easily (and in neater slices) when chilled. Once sliced, you can then reassemble the roast and wrap it tightly in foil before reheating in the oven.

Click here to see A Vegan Holiday Dinner from the Party Vegan.


Truffled Wild Mushroom Pâté Published: Oct 3, 2016 · Updated: Oct 21, 2020 · This post may contain affiliate links. This gorgeous Mushroom Pate is a beautiful vegan pâté flavoured with wild mushrooms and a whisper of fragrant truffle oil. Serve with toasted sourdough and your favourite crackers, along with a glass of wine. When you think of pate it is difficult to not think about France. But its history dates further back than that, all the way to the ancient Romans, and perhaps before. As it has been adopted by different cultures over the centuries it has evolved and changed. The French refined it, into the dish that we know today. It is a dish that many see as fiddly. But don't let appearances fool you because this delicious and utterly decadent mushroom pate is easy. Especially when your food processor does all the hard work! This delicious and utterly decadent mushroom pate, although it requires a few ingredients, is easy to prepare! Oh, and it's vegan too! A mixture of wild mushrooms adds a lovely depth to this vegan pate. I've used a mix of baby swiss brown (also known as cremini mushrooms), king brown, shiitake and wood ear mushrooms. Joining the mushrooms are creamy cannellini beans (tinned ones are fine) and nutty French green lentils. The cannellini beans provide a lovely creaminess while the lentils add body and another dimension. To this mushroom pate, I like to add a bit of truffle oil - for an extra touch of decadence. Choose a good truffle oil here. The better the quality the better the end result. The finishing touch is a lovely mushroom jelly. This is a totally optional step but adds the lovely glossy sheen on top. How to make creamy mushroom sauce?

  1. Cook the mushrooms: Melt butter and olive oil together in a large frying pan then fry the mushrooms until they are golden brown. For intense flavor, it’s important to let the mushrooms brown well. Add garlic and allow to cook for another 30 seconds.
  2. Make the sauce: Pour the cream into the pan. Mix well then pour in the milk and cornstarch mix. Allow to simmer until the sauce has thickened and any flouriness has cooked off. (If you prefer, you can omit the cornstarch mix and reduce the sauce down to thicken. You might need to start with more cream though as this will result in less sauce, overall.) Season with lemon, salt and pepper and serve.

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I bought this book in my first year of being vegan, and it's served me well over the years. It was an absolute life-saver when I first got it, because I never really knew what to make for parties or special occasions. Robin Robertson really lays a good foundation for vegan entertaining in this book, and virtually all of the recipes that I've tried have been excellent. There is a lot of creativity in this book, and a lot of good information on party planning and set up. This book was one of the first vegan entertaining books I can remember - there are more out there now - and it really opened a door for what one could do, it was really revolutionary, and it's full of inspiration.

Most of the recipes are quick and easy to prepare. The appetizers are particularly simple. Some recipes like the Porcini stuffed seitan roast, or the seitan roulades are more time consuming, but worth the trouble if you're looking to impress. Most recipes use common pantry-friendly ingredients but some of the `fancier' appetizer or dessert recipes may call for certain things - like vegan cheese - that you may not have on hand. In each case, the recipes are clearly written, with easy to follow instructions which I appreciate.

Some draw-backs of the book are that there is no nutritional information provided. Some people really care about this, others - like me - not so much. Some people have also complained about the set up of the book. The book is divided into chapters such as "Halloween" "Christmas" "Pot-Luck" etc. and gives you a grouping of recipes to serve at each gathering. Usually the recipes consist of an appetizer or two, a side or two, a main course, and a dessert. Personally I think the set up of the book is neat, and original, and I don't mind that there isn't a large table of contents at the beginning of the book. This book does however have a large index in the back, that lists each recipe and what page it can be found on. It also tells you which recipes can be made in advance, which are quick and easy, and so on. This is particularly helpful when trying to plan a party.

My only real complaint with this book is that there are no pictures. I've come to understand that this is the norm for Robin Robertson, for whatever reason her books NEVER have pictures, and while I often find this to be a huge disappointment and a discouraging factor I can overlook it in the case of this book. Robertson's recipes in this book are so good, that it would be silly to ignore the book just because it lacks photography.

All in all I think this is a really wonderful little book. It's helped me through many holiday gatherings and everything I've made has not only impressed my husband and I but has won over even my most die-hard omni friends. With "Party Vegan" I never have to worry about what to bring to my next gathering or what to serve my guests. I just wish I had more time to try all of the recipes, but these are the ones I've tried so far, and what I thought of them.

Artichoke Tapenade - Loved it
Sun-dried Tomato and Green Olive Biscotti - Loved it
Orange Kissed Chocolate Tiramisu - Pretty good
Sushi Rice Balls - Loved it
Everyone's Favorite Ice Cream Cake - Loved it
Pan-Fried Sesame Noodles and Broccoli - Loved it
Szechwan Green Beans and Shallots - Loved it
`Finger Lickin' Tempeh Fingers - LOVED IT! - Favorite!
Chickpea Artichoke Bites with Rosemary Aioli - Loved it
Rosemary Aioli - Loved it
Red Bliss Potato and Fennel Soup - Loved it
Sauteed Rainbow Chard with Balsamic Drizzle - Loved it
Chocolate Cherry Cheesecake - Loved it
Whiskey and Soda Bread - Pretty good
Black Olive Tapenade with Carrots and Orange Bell Pepper Strips - Loved it
Black Bean and Butternut Chili - Loved it - Favorite
Savory Pumpkin Muffins with Black Sesame Seeds - Loved It - Favorite!
Black Rice Salad - Loved it
Orange-Carrot Cake with Dark Chocolate Icing - Loved it
Pan Gravy - Love it - a go-to easy gravy recipe for me
Cranberry Apple Relish - Pretty good
Pecan Pumpkin Pie - Pretty good
Porcini Stuffed Seitan with Wild Mushroom Sauce - Pretty good
Herb Mashed Potatoes - Loved it
Spinach Phyllo Cigars with Walnuts and Figs - Loved it
Artichoke Stuffed Mushrooms - Loved it
Truffled White Bean Hummus - pretty good

PS: The book is worth the cost for the "Finger Lickin" Tempeh Fingers recipe alone. No lie. I actually had the opportunity to try this dish at a vegan friends house, and the minute I got back home I bought this book just on the deliciousness of that recipe. It is by far my favorite, in the book, and one of my favorite ways to eat tempeh. If you miss BBQ this is the recipe for you!


Seitan Porcini Beef Stew

I’ve been on a mission to build a better vegan beef stew. Anyone can throw some wine and tomatoes into a pot but even with all the right ingredients, it’s all too easy to make a flat stew. I wanted deep complex flavors, a thick and silky base, chunky carrots and potatoes cooked just right. And of course, beefiness. And I wanted it to all happen in one pot. A simple filling stew shouldn’t destroy the entire kitchen.

Put plainly, I wanted the “DAAAAYAMN!” factor. Nothing too fussy, but a bowl that not only comforts you on a cold winter’s night, it straight-up makes you look forward to the snowiest, windiest, all-the-roads-shut-downiest night possible, just so you can make stew.

So I pulled a Cook’s Illustrated and made vegan beef stews all week. Chipping away at the recipe, then building it back up. I tried several different “beefs” tofu, tempeh, and seitan, finally settling on a mix of homemade vegan sausage and dried porcini mushrooms. Tofu was a little too mushy, or took too much work to make it not mushy. Tempeh just crumbled too much, despite my best efforts. The seitan sausage provides flavor and hearty texture without needing to be sauteed, while the porcinis create a sultry broth and a falling-off-the-bone meatiness (that phrase isn’t gross when you consider that there aren’t any actual bones here, right?) that just sings “Beef Stew.”

For the base I knew I didn’t want a limp tomato sauce. In fact, I wanted to steer away from tomato as much as possible. I tried lentils as a backdrop but it was too…lentil-y. I also tried starting with a roux, and it was yummy but too thick…more like a sauce than a stew, plus it made the veggies cook unevenly. Finally, I settled on a slurry — a mix of water and flour that can be added after the veggies have cooked. When slowly heated it becomes thick (but not too thick) and velvetty, and holds in all the great flavor from the wine, mushrooms and spices. Just a touch of tomato paste provided even more body and a hint of tang.

The other challenge was getting the veggies to cook perfectly. Potatoes overcook easily and I didn’t want potato soup. Adding the potatoes after the initial ingredients come to a boil and then simmering them until tender is a fool proof method. Then the slurry is added and cooked just long enough to marry the flavors and create TSH (Total Stew Harmony.)

So yeah, long-story-that-I-just-made-you-read-short: I love this stew! The one thing that maybe isn’t ideal is that you need to have the sausages on hand, but they are so very easy to whip up. Make a batch the night before and you’ll have more than you need for this recipe so it’s totally worth it. But there are some alternatives, see below.

Anticipated questions:
Can you make this gluten free?
Yes! Sub the flour for 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch or 1/4 of your favorite gluten free flour mix. Sub the sausages for thawed extra firm frozen tofu with the water pressed out (this was my second favorite “meat” while experimenting.) Slice tofu into 1/2 inch thick triangles. Add an extra 1/2 teaspoon crushed fennel seed to the stew for sausage-y flavor.

Can you use a different dried mushroom?
Yes! Shiitake or portobello will work. But chop them up a little finer before adding.

Can you use seitan instead of sausages?
Yes! Use 2 cups of sliced seitan but saute it first, then remove it from the pot and add later, otherwise it will be rubbery.

Can you make this in a slow cooker?
I haven’t tried it. Why don’t you give it a shot and let us know?

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, quartered and thickly sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
3 medium carrot, peeled, sliced on a bias, 1/2 inch thick
1 cup red wine
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground fennel or crushed fennel seeds
Fresh black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 oz dried porcini mushrooms
3 cups vegetable broth
1 1/2 pounds potatoes (any type), lazily peeled, cut in 1 1/2 inch chunks

1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons tomato paste
3 vegan sausages, sliced into chunky half mooons

Chopped fresh parsley for garnish (optional)

Preheat a 4 quart pot over medium high heat.

Saute onions and a pinch of salt in oil until until translucent, 4 to 7 minutes. Add garlic, for about a minute, until fragrant.

Add carrots, wine, rosemary (crushed in your fingers), thyme (crushed in your fingers), paprika, fennel, fresh black pepper and salt and bring to a boil. The liquid should reduce in about 3 minutes.

Add porcinis and vegetable broth, cover and bring to a full boil for 5 minutes or so, to quickly cook the procinis. Now add the potatoes, lower heat and bring to a simmer (not a full boil). Let the potatoes cook just until fork tender, about 15 minutes.

In a measuring cup, mix the flour into the water with a fork until no lumps are left. Slowly add the broth/flour to the pot, mixing well. Mix in the tomato paste. Let thicken for 5 minutes or so. Add the sausages and continue to cook. In about 5 more minutes it should be perfectly thick but still smooth. Taste for salt and seasonings, and serve! Sprinkle individual servings with fresh parsley if you want to be 70s food chic.


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I bought this book in my first year of being vegan, and it's served me well over the years. It was an absolute life-saver when I first got it, because I never really knew what to make for parties or special occasions. Robin Robertson really lays a good foundation for vegan entertaining in this book, and virtually all of the recipes that I've tried have been excellent. There is a lot of creativity in this book, and a lot of good information on party planning and set up. This book was one of the first vegan entertaining books I can remember - there are more out there now - and it really opened a door for what one could do, it was really revolutionary, and it's full of inspiration.

Most of the recipes are quick and easy to prepare. The appetizers are particularly simple. Some recipes like the Porcini stuffed seitan roast, or the seitan roulades are more time consuming, but worth the trouble if you're looking to impress. Most recipes use common pantry-friendly ingredients but some of the `fancier' appetizer or dessert recipes may call for certain things - like vegan cheese - that you may not have on hand. In each case, the recipes are clearly written, with easy to follow instructions which I appreciate.

Some draw-backs of the book are that there is no nutritional information provided. Some people really care about this, others - like me - not so much. Some people have also complained about the set up of the book. The book is divided into chapters such as "Halloween" "Christmas" "Pot-Luck" etc. and gives you a grouping of recipes to serve at each gathering. Usually the recipes consist of an appetizer or two, a side or two, a main course, and a dessert. Personally I think the set up of the book is neat, and original, and I don't mind that there isn't a large table of contents at the beginning of the book. This book does however have a large index in the back, that lists each recipe and what page it can be found on. It also tells you which recipes can be made in advance, which are quick and easy, and so on. This is particularly helpful when trying to plan a party.

My only real complaint with this book is that there are no pictures. I've come to understand that this is the norm for Robin Robertson, for whatever reason her books NEVER have pictures, and while I often find this to be a huge disappointment and a discouraging factor I can overlook it in the case of this book. Robertson's recipes in this book are so good, that it would be silly to ignore the book just because it lacks photography.

All in all I think this is a really wonderful little book. It's helped me through many holiday gatherings and everything I've made has not only impressed my husband and I but has won over even my most die-hard omni friends. With "Party Vegan" I never have to worry about what to bring to my next gathering or what to serve my guests. I just wish I had more time to try all of the recipes, but these are the ones I've tried so far, and what I thought of them.

Artichoke Tapenade - Loved it
Sun-dried Tomato and Green Olive Biscotti - Loved it
Orange Kissed Chocolate Tiramisu - Pretty good
Sushi Rice Balls - Loved it
Everyone's Favorite Ice Cream Cake - Loved it
Pan-Fried Sesame Noodles and Broccoli - Loved it
Szechwan Green Beans and Shallots - Loved it
`Finger Lickin' Tempeh Fingers - LOVED IT! - Favorite!
Chickpea Artichoke Bites with Rosemary Aioli - Loved it
Rosemary Aioli - Loved it
Red Bliss Potato and Fennel Soup - Loved it
Sauteed Rainbow Chard with Balsamic Drizzle - Loved it
Chocolate Cherry Cheesecake - Loved it
Whiskey and Soda Bread - Pretty good
Black Olive Tapenade with Carrots and Orange Bell Pepper Strips - Loved it
Black Bean and Butternut Chili - Loved it - Favorite
Savory Pumpkin Muffins with Black Sesame Seeds - Loved It - Favorite!
Black Rice Salad - Loved it
Orange-Carrot Cake with Dark Chocolate Icing - Loved it
Pan Gravy - Love it - a go-to easy gravy recipe for me
Cranberry Apple Relish - Pretty good
Pecan Pumpkin Pie - Pretty good
Porcini Stuffed Seitan with Wild Mushroom Sauce - Pretty good
Herb Mashed Potatoes - Loved it
Spinach Phyllo Cigars with Walnuts and Figs - Loved it
Artichoke Stuffed Mushrooms - Loved it
Truffled White Bean Hummus - pretty good

PS: The book is worth the cost for the "Finger Lickin" Tempeh Fingers recipe alone. No lie. I actually had the opportunity to try this dish at a vegan friends house, and the minute I got back home I bought this book just on the deliciousness of that recipe. It is by far my favorite, in the book, and one of my favorite ways to eat tempeh. If you miss BBQ this is the recipe for you!


Vegan Thanksgiving Menus

When it comes to planning a vegan Thanksgiving menu, there are a few different schools of thought. One is to make a meal as close to the traditional table using vegan ingredients. For example, the menu could include a centerpiece of your own stuffed seitan roast, or perhaps a Tofurky, Field Roast, or Gardein roast.

The side dishes might include family favorites such as mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, gravy, extra stuffing, and maybe even a green bean casserole. A variation on the traditional theme would be to serve a stuffed squash or some kind of loaf as the centerpiece, instead of a roast. A third option is to make your own tradition with a non-classic meal such as lasagna or maybe a Moroccan bisteeya.

Whatever you decide to make, it will be easier (and more fun for you) if you plan ahead and make as many things in advance as possible. Then you can relax and enjoy your meal with family and friends.

At my house we enjoy the flavors of traditional dishes, even down to a veganized green bean casserole, reminiscent of the kind Jon’s family had every year when he was growing up, or you can try my recipe for Deconstructed Green Bean Casserole.

The following are three of my holiday menus. The first menu is one I shared on Vegan.com (photograph at top). You can find all the recipes for this menu by going to this link and clicking on each menu item:

Seitan en Croute
Madeira Sauce
Rum-Spiked Sweet Potatoes with Pomegranate Pecans
Triple Cranberry Relish
Roasted Asparagus
Garlic Smashers
Stuffed Winter Squash (optional main dish)
Ginger-Dusted Pumpkin Cheezecake

The following two menus are from Party Vegan where you can find all the recipes:

Chestnut Bisque
Buttercup Squash Stuffed with Wild Rice, Shiitakes, and Caramelized Leeks
Pan Gravy
Roasted Autumn Vegetables
Cranberry-Apple Relish
Pecan-Pumpkin Pie

Mixed Greens with Caramelized Walnuts and Balsamic Pear Vinaigrette
Porcini-Stuffed Seitan with Wild Mushroom Sauce
Herb-Mashed Potatoes
Wilted Baby Spinach with Dried Cranberries
Spiced Two-Apple Tart with Cider Crème

I’ll delve into more options and provide additional recipes and tips in upcoming posts. In the meantime, be sure to enter the Party Vegan Giveaway by leaving a comment in the previous post.

ANNOUNCEMENT: For more Thanksgiving tips, tune into the VegNews Twitter Chat tomorrow (Wednesday, November 14) @ 6pm PT/9pm ET where I will be answering your questions (I’m (@GlobalVegan) on Twitter.) Also on the panel will be Allyson Kramer (@manifestvegan), Hannah Kaminsky (@BitterSweet), Nava Atlas (@navaatlas2), and Ayinde Howell (@AYINDE).

Out of curiosity does the Field Roast taste like Seitan, in case anyone knows? I read that it does contain Vital Wheat Gluten but curious as to the actual end product. I’ve never tried any of their products before.
Stuart

Stuart, I’d say it tastes like a nicely seasoned seitan. Good products, I think.

It looks great and I love that taste but here at home there are no other takers for seitan, sadly. I’m going to look and see what Whole Foods has of their line. Some of the other offerings on the site looked very tempting. Thanks for the reply!
Stuart

Stuart, The texture and flavor is actually better than most plain seitan, so they might like it! Worth a try. If not, more for you!

Can I make the seitan en croute a day in advance and reheat? Thanks!

Edie, Since the individual seitan en croute only take 20 minutes to bake, the best thing to do is make them ahead of time up to the point where you wrap them in pastry and refrigerate. Just leave them in the refrigerator overnight (tightly covered) and you can do that final baking when ready to serve. This works out better than baking them twice in order to keep the pastry flaky and prevent it from over-browning. So essentially, you will be making them a day in advance, but just saving that final baking until you’re ready to serve it. That’s what I do!

Wonderful! Hope to impress the family skeptics next Thursday. New to plant based eating…easing into it and my husband asked for alternative to turkey! I was shocked. This should fit the bill nicely. Thank you.


  • 8 ounces whole-wheat linguine pasta
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1 ½ pounds mixed mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup diced shallots
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • ½ cup sour cream or crème fraîche
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground pepper
  • Finely chopped fresh parsley for garnish

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. Cook pasta according to package directions. Reserve 1/2 cup of the pasta water, then drain the pasta.

Meanwhile, heat oil and garlic in a large skillet over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add mushrooms, shallots and thyme and increase heat to high. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid the mushrooms release has evaporated and the mushrooms are starting to brown, 11 to 13 minutes.

Add wine to the pan and cook until it is reduced by about half, about 3 minutes. Stir in the reserved pasta water, sour cream (or crème fraîche), Parmesan, butter, salt and pepper. Add the pasta and toss to coat. Serve topped with more Parmesan and parsley, if desired.


21 Vegan Mushroom Recipes for When You Want Meaty Without the Meat

All veggies should be part of a healthy diet, but if you’re vegan or just trying to cut back on meat, it’s time to pay special attention to mushrooms (no, not those kinds).

Their hearty bite and texture make them perfect meat substitutes in plant-based diets, whether you’re using them in burgers or spaghetti sauce.

And don’t worry — you don’t need to settle for portobello every time. There are so many varieties to try that give you that sought-after umami flavor while being a solid source of nutrients. What’s not to love? Here are our faves.

1. King oyster mushroom “scallops” with mint-pea purée

Sliced thick to look exactly like the classic seafood appetizer, these oyster mushroom bites could fool just about anyone. Their meaty texture offers the ideal contrast against the fresh, minty three-ingredient pea topping.

2. Vegan stuffed portobello mushrooms

Vegetarian stuffed mushrooms often involve cheese, but these vegan bites are dairy-free. They boast a pecan, ginger, and veggie filling that’s the perfect balance of rich and light. They don’t even need bread crumbs on top, so they’re easily gluten-free too.

3. Mushroom walnut lentil pâté

Even meat eaters might shudder at the thought of a traditional pâté made with liver, so this mushroom-based version works for everyone.

Brown sugar, miso paste, sage, and fresh thyme add tons of depth to the spread, and walnuts and lentils provide a richness alongside the meaty shiitakes.

4. Mushroom ceviche

Who says ceviche can only be made with raw fish? You might just be surprised how much this looks like the real deal.

This vegan take does require some stove work to cook the oyster mushrooms, but once you toss them with jalapeño, cucumber, avocado, and onion, it won’t taste any different from the marinated seafood appetizer.

5. Portobello mushroom bruschetta

For a lower carb alternative to bruschetta, spoon your tomato and basil mixture into portobello caps instead of onto bread slices. The “cups” are adorable and are a perfect light starter for a heavier main course.

6. Mushroom and roasted garlic hummus

Whether you’re looking for a healthy snack or a party appetizer, hummus is never a bad idea — especially when it’s homemade.

Next time you make it, use this recipe, which jazzes up the chickpea pureé with some roasted mushrooms for a lot of extra savory flavor.

7. Garlic mushroom kebabs

No grill? No problem! These kebabs are actually made in the oven, so you can whip ’em up any time of year. Another bonus: The marinating process takes just 15 minutes, so they’re a great last-minute appetizer.

8. Silky cream of mushroom soup

Yup, you can totally have a soup that’s silky and vegan at the same time.

How does it get its creamy texture? Potatoes and sunflower seeds are added to the mushroom broth, and then the whole thing is puréed until it reaches that glossy consistency.

9. Creamy coconut and mushroom quinoa soup

For a soup that can double as a full meal, try this soup-er (we had to) satisfying recipe. With healthy fats from the coconut milk, protein-packed quinoa, and a variety of mushroom types, it’s got a ton of flavor but is easy to make — no blending necessary.

10. Warm balsamic mushroom salad with pine nut Parmesan

Warm toppings go a long way toward making a salad feel more like a main meal than a side. In this case, it’s a simple sauté of mushrooms and navy beans on a bed of arugula.

And making the pine nut “Parmesan” isn’t nearly as complicated as you might imagine — all you need is a food processor.

11. Quinoa and shiitake mushroom salad

Mushrooms don’t need to be the star of a dish to stand out. Here, they show off their earthy flavor as part of an ensemble cast of ingredients.

From the tiny grains of quinoa to the juicy cherry tomatoes to the fresh and crunchy corn, this salad is a total party of textures.

12. Roasted mushroom and romaine salad

Chopped, toasted pecans and crushed rosemary join cremini mushrooms to make this warm salad totally cold-weather-worthy. With a simple, herb-kissed dressing, it’s the perfect addition to a fall or winter menu.

13. Mushroom, lemon, and lentil salad

Sliced mushrooms and lentils pair up for a powerhouse salad that doesn’t skimp on protein, fiber, or — thanks to plenty of lemon and garlic — flavor.

The veggie and legume mixture can be eaten hot or cold, making this a solid meal-prep option for those of us with a busy week ahead.

14. Mushroom salad with spinach and flaxseeds

In the time it would take you to assemble a regular cold salad, you can make one that’s semi-cooked to get a little more comfort in your meal.

Mushrooms are skillet-cooked with garlic and scallions, tumbled onto a pile of spinach, sprinkled with fiber-filled flaxseeds, and then drizzled with a tangy Dijon vinaigrette. It’s surprisingly simple, perfectly light, and so satisfying.

15. Maple-Dijon portobello burgers

While you’ve probably seen a portobello burger as the vegan option in every bistro you’ve ever been to, this particular recipe stands out for needing only four basic ingredients.

Instead of being carelessly slapped onto a bun, these mushroom caps are generously brushed with a sweet, tangy maple syrup and Dijon mustard sauce before being baked or grilled.

16. Vegan oyster mushroom and artichoke “crab cakes”

It may look fancy, but this creative vegan spin on crab cakes and rémoulade is a surprisingly simple 30-minute meal.

Chickpea flour holds the artichoke and oyster mushroom patties together, and the mayo-free, sesame seed-based sauce takes no time to whip up in a blender. Make this when you want to seriously impress your fellow diners.

17. 5-ingredient easy mushroom tacos

We probably had you at “tacos,” but the fact that these take all of 5 minutes to put together may make them your new go-to recipe for vegan Mexican night.

It’s all thanks to the quick-cooking mushrooms. They need nothing more than a bit of garlic and onion to become the perfect tortilla filling.

18. Vegetarian summer wild mushroom paella with chanterelles and black trumpets

For a showstopping vegan entrée, this meat- and seafood-free paella is an absolute winner thanks to the addition of gorgeous, golden chanterelles and black trumpet mushrooms.

It takes a bit of time to let the saffron, white wine, thyme, and garlic flavors soak into the dish, but after one bite of the end result, you’ll be so glad you put in the effort.

19. Groovy mushroom toast

Mushrooms on toast is one of those easy meals you can throw together on a busy evening, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be special.

This recipe goes for an upgrade by using oyster and shiitake ’shrooms instead of the standard button variety. Fresh herbs and hummus kick up the complexity of the flavors.

20. Vegan mushroom stroganoff

We’ll always be grateful to ingredients like plant-based milk, nutritional yeast, and — duh — mushrooms for allowing us to enjoy meatless and dairy-free versions of dishes like this.

Cooked into a creamy, rich sauce to ladle over pasta, this stroganoff proves that going vegan doesn’t have to mean compromising on foods we love.

21. Vegan sticky apricot mushrooms

Pick naturally sweetened apricot preserves to keep this dish lower in sugar. You’ll still get their fruity flavor, which, along with some fresh orange juice, is crucial to the dish’s sweetness.

With soy sauce for a savory balance and chili flakes for a spicy kick, you’ve never had mushrooms quite like this.

Whether you’re vegan or not, these mushroom recipes give you plenty of ways to feast on the edible fungi. From appetizers to main courses, this roundup proves there’s always room for more mushrooms in your meals.


Cooking with Alison

I made ravioli from scratch for the first time (recipe here). For the filling, I used porcini, chanterelle, and lobster mushrooms with ricotta, parmesan and goat cheese. I wanted to make a sauce that would pair well with mushroom ravioli, but there were so many suitable (and delicious) options, that I couldn’t pick just one or two. So, I made 4 different sauces. They are all easy to make and range from simple and comforting to sophisticated and fancy.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #1 is a comforting and hearty tomato sauce. It is the simplest of the 4 recipes. The tomato contrasts the creamy mushroom filling nicely.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #2 is a rose sauce. It is the only cream based sauce and it’s fun to make because it involves setting vodka on fire. This sauce is very similar to the sauce that I make for my vodka penne (recipe here).

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #3 is a white wine and butter sauce that goes really well with the mushrooms. I like to serve this sauce over giant raviolis.

Mushroom Ravioli Sauce Pairing #4 is one of the simplest, yet the fanciest sauce that I’ve paired with mushroom ravioli. If only I could afford white truffles to go with this, because that’s how they serve it in some parts of Italy. I like to serve this browned butter over giant raviolis.

Photo above: Giant raviolis in White Wine Sauce

Tomato Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1/2 cup tomato based pasta sauce per serving (I used store bought)

1 tbsp whipping cream per 1/2 cup of tomato sauce used (optional)

grated parmesan cheese (I use a Microplane coarse grater)

freshly cracked black pepper

parsley for garnish (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot. Meanwhile, heat the tomato sauce in a covered sauce pot over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Use a slotted spoon (I use a Chinese wire strainer) to remove the ravioli from the water and drain well. Gently stir the whipping cream into the tomato sauce and toss the ravioli in the sauce. Plate the pasta, add some freshly cracked black pepper, top with some grated parmesan cheese and garnish with parsley (if using). Serve hot.

Photo above: Standard sized ravioli in Tomato Sauce

Vodka Cream Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

4 tbsp tomato based pasta sauce

salt and ground black pepper

grated parmesan cheese (I use a Microplane coarse grater)

fresh parsley or basil for garnish (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot. Meanwhile, over medium heat, heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large saute pan. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add the vodka. Very carefully, using a lit match, tilt the pan slightly and light the vodka on fire at the very edge of the pan keeping your hands as far away from the pan as possible. Be very careful, as the flames spread immediately and come up quite high. Holding the handle of the pan, shake the pan gently back and forth until all of the vodka is burnt off and the fire goes out by itself. Be careful not to spill any of the vodka from the pan. Then add the cream and simmer for 1 minute. Stir in the tomato sauce and salt and pepper to taste. Once the sauce is heated through, toss with the strained ravioli. Plate the pasta, top with some grated parmesan cheese and garnish with parsley or basil if using. Serve hot.

White Wine Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

1 1/2 cups chicken broth (or sodium reduced chicken broth)

2 tbsp + 3 tbsp unsalted butter

2 garlic cloves, finely minced

1/2 tsp dried tarragon (or 1 tsp fresh parsley, chopped)

white truffle oil (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot. Meanwhile, in a saucepan, melt 2 tbsp of butter with a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat. Add the diced shallots and cook, stirring frequently, for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Then add the garlic and the chopped fresh parsley if using. Add a pinch of white pepper and once the garlic is aromatic and softened, about 30 seconds, add the white wine. Bring the liquid to a boil and reduce the heat to maintain a simmer until the liquid is reduced to about 1/2, about 7 minutes. (I like to reduce the sauce until I have more than half of the liquid left.) Add the chicken broth and dried tarragon if using and increase the heat back to medium. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat again, and simmer until the liquid is reduced by about 1/2, about 7 minutes. Add 3 tbsp of butter and mix in well. Remove the sauce from the heat and adjust salt and white pepper to taste. Plate the strained ravioli, pour the sauce over the ravioli and drizzle with white truffle oil if using. Serve hot.

Photo above: Giant ravioli in Browned Butter Sauce

Browned Butter Sauce for Mushroom Ravioli

makes sauce for 3 to 4 servings

mushroom ravioli (store bought or made from scratch, recipe here)

small bunch of fresh sage leaves (optional)

white truffle shavings (optional)

Cook the mushroom ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water until the pasta is tender and the filling is hot. Meanwhile, in a heavy bottomed sauce pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Swirl it frequently until the milk solids brown and give off a nutty aroma. Remove from heat and throw in a few sage leaves if using. While still hot, pour the sauce over strained ravioli and top with white truffle shavings if using. Serve immediately.