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Rooster with wine

Rooster with wine


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In a larger bowl put the wine, peppercorns, herbs, spices, cleaned and chopped vegetables, and at the end add the sliced ​​chicken. Let marinate for 24 hours in the cold. Pork is kept in brine for 48 hours.

After the passage of time, we take the chicken out of the brine, we wipe it until it dries in a paper towel and we keep the marinade. Season the chicken and leave it like this for 10 minutes. Pork removed from the brine (I had ham and bacon put in brine and there I kept the piece of meat, 48 hours) cut into small pieces. In a bowl, on the large eye from the stove, heat the pieces of pork over medium heat until the pieces become golden brown, crispy. When it is ready, take out the meat and set it aside.

We make the fire bigger and in the fat left from the pork (if it is too little, we add a spoonful of lard) we add the chicken meat and fry it on all sides; we take out the hen and put it aside. Add the flour, mix, put the chicken back in the bowl and add the cognac. Carefully light with the match. When the flame subsides, add the marinade.

Bake for an hour, an hour and a half (depending on the chicken) over low heat. Then add the roast pork. 10 minutes before it was ready I added 300 g of small Champignion mushrooms and let them cook in the wine in the bowl.

Great appetite!


Recipe: rooster with wine

Coq au vin is another easy dish that looks like it’s hard. It’s not. In fact, this is the kind of dish you might enjoy spending a leisurely afternoon with. There are plenty of opportunities for breaks. It’s durable, delicious, and the perfect illustration of the principles of turning something big and tough and unlovely into something truly wonderful. I know it looks like a lot of ingredients, and that the recipe might be complicated. Just take your time. Knock out your prep one thing at a time, slowly building your setup. Listen to some music while you do it. There’s an open bottle of wine left from the recipe, so have a glass now and again. Just clean up after yourself as you go, so your kitchen doesn’t look like a disaster area when you start the actual cooking.

You should, with any luck, reach a Zen-like state of pleasurable calm. And like the very best dishes, coq au vin is one of those that goes on the stove looking, smelling, and tasting pretty nasty, and yet later, through the mysterious, alchemical processes of time and heat, turns into something magical.

Ingredients:

1 bottle (1 liter) plus 1 cup of red wine
1 onion, diced
1 carrot, cut into ¼-inch slices
1 celery rib, cut into ½-inch slices
4 whole cloves
1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
1 garnished bouquet (bundle of aromatic herbs)
1 whole chicken, about 3½ lb “trimmed” –meaning guts, wing tips, and neckbone removed
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
6 tbsp butter, softened
1 tbsp flour
¼ lb slab or country bacon, cut into small oblongs (lardons) about ¼ by 1 inch
½ Ib small, white button mushrooms, stems removed
12 pearl onions, peeled pinch of sugar

Preparation:

DAY ONE

The day before you even begin to cook, combine the bottle of red wine, the diced onion (that’s the big onion, not the pearl onions), sliced ​​carrot, celery, cloves, peppercorns, and bouquet garni in a large, deep bowl. Add the chicken and submerge it in the liquid so that all of it is covered. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

DAY TWO

Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat it dry. Put it aside. Strain the marinade through the fine strainer, reserving the liquids and solids separately. Season the chicken with salt and pepper inside and out. In a large Dutch oven, heat the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter until almost smoking, and then sear the chicken, turning with the tongs to evenly brown the skin. Once browned, remove it from the pot and set it aside again. Add the reserved onions, celery, and carrot to the pot and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and golden brown. That should take you about 10 minutes.

Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and mix well with the wooden spoon so that the vegetables are coated. Now stir in the reserved strained marinade. Put the chicken back in the pot, along with the garni bouquet. Cook this for about 1 hour and 15 minutes over low heat.

Have a drink. You’re almost there…

While your chicken stews slowly in the pot, cook the bacon lardons in a small sauté pan over medium heat until golden brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain it on paper towels, making sure to keep about 1 tablespoon of fat in the pan. Sauté the mushroom tops in the bacon fat until golden brown. Set them aside.

Now, in the small saucepan, combine the pearl onions, the pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt, and 2 tablespoons of the butter. Add just enough water to just cover the onions, then cover the pan with parchment paper trimmed to the same size as your pan. (I suppose you can use foil if you must.) Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the water has evaporated. Keep a close eye on it. Remove the paper cover and continue to cook until the onions are golden brown. Set the onions aside and add the remaining cup of red wine to the hot pan, scraping up all the bits on the bottom of the pot. Season with salt and pepper and reduce over medium-high heat until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon.

Your work is pretty much done here. One more thing and then it’s wine and kudos

When the chicken is cooked through — meaning tender, the juice from the thigh running clear when pricked — carefully remove from the liquid, cut into quarters, and arrange on the deep serving platter. Strain the cooking liquid (again) into the reduced red wine. Now just add the bacon, mushrooms, and pearl onions, adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter. Now pour that sauce over the chicken and dazzle your friends with your brilliance. Serve with buttered noodles and a Bourgogne Rouge.

If you are a bold adventurer, and live near a live-poultry market or friendly pork butcher, you might want to play around a bit after doing this recipe a few times. By cutting back on the flour and thickening with fresh pig or chicken blood, you will add a whole new dimension to the dish. Be warned, though: add the blood slowly. It doesn’t take much to make the sauce sit up like a rock. (Blood freezes nicely, by the way, so you might consider keeping a stash in small, individual packets. You never know when you’ll need it.)

© Anthony Bourdain, 2004, Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles Cookbook: Strategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking, Bloomsbury Publishing Inc.


How To Make Cock In Wine

Step 1: Heat the oil in a Dutch oven or heavy stock pot and sear the chicken on both sides until nicely browned and then set aside.

Step 2: Add the bacon and cook until done and then add the shallots and cook for another 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add the mushrooms and garlic and saute until the mushrooms release their juices and are softened, another 5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt and pepper and then transfer to a plate.

Step 3: Heat the butter in the pot and whisk in the flour, continuously whisking until it becomes a rich golden brown color. Whisk in the wine and chicken stock. Bring it to a boil for about 2 minutes and continue whisking to loosen the browned bits on the bottom of the pot. Stir in the tomato paste, ground dried porcini mushrooms, thyme, and bay leaf.

Step 4: Return the chicken to the pot and cover. Return it to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 30 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through. Return the bacon / onion / mushroom mixture to the pot and simmer for another 10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve the chicken over noodles with the sauce spooned over it.


How To Make Cock In Wine

Step 1: Heat the oil in a Dutch oven or heavy stock pot and sear the chicken on both sides until nicely browned and then set aside.

Step 2: Add the bacon and cook until done and then add the shallots and cook for another 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add the mushrooms and garlic and saute until the mushrooms release their juices and are softened, another 5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt and pepper and then transfer to a plate.

Step 3: Heat the butter in the pot and whisk in the flour, continuously whisking until it becomes a rich golden brown color. Whisk in the wine and chicken stock. Bring it to a boil for about 2 minutes and continue whisking to loosen the browned bits on the bottom of the pot. Stir in the tomato paste, ground dried porcini mushrooms, thyme, and bay leaf.

Step 4: Return the chicken to the pot and cover. Return it to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 30 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through. Return the bacon / onion / mushroom mixture to the pot and simmer for another 10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve the chicken over noodles with the sauce spooned over it.


Honor Julia Child with This Coq Au Vin Recipe

Julia Child’s 100th birthday is coming up on August 15th and I can’t think of a better way to celebrate and honor such an inspirational woman than cooking a meal that was near and dear to her heart.

Basically, coq au vin just translates to “rooster with wine”, but we tend to think of it, rather, as chicken slowly simmered in a rich red wine sauce, with tiny crumbles of bacon throughout. If you’ve never attempted cock or wine before, now’s your chance. It’s really not terribly time consuming compared to other traditional French dishes, and can be made in about an hour.

The alcohol cooks off in this dish, but the flavor of the wine is imparted, along with smoky bacon, garlic, onion and rosemary throughout the cooking process. Some recipes use pearl onions in their coq au vin, but I prefer just mushrooms. I also like to serve this with a baked potato and a big green salad! Plus more wine for drinking, of course.


Honor Julia Child with This Coq Au Vin Recipe

Julia Child’s 100th birthday is coming up on August 15th and I can’t think of a better way to celebrate and honor such an inspirational woman than cooking a meal that was near and dear to her heart.

Basically, coq au vin just translates to “rooster with wine”, but we tend to think of it, rather, as chicken slowly simmered in a rich red wine sauce, with tiny crumbles of bacon throughout. If you’ve never attempted cock or wine before, now’s your chance. It’s really not terribly time consuming compared to other traditional French dishes, and can be made in about an hour.

The alcohol cooks off in this dish, but the flavor of the wine is imparted, along with smoky bacon, garlic, onion and rosemary throughout the cooking process. Some recipes use pearl onions in their coq au vin, but I prefer just mushrooms. I also like to serve this with a baked potato and a big green salad! Plus more wine for drinking, of course.


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My God! No one in their right mind would call the Wine Rooster! Please remove this recipe from the folder.

Atrocious! This would end up as a soggy mess. Even though I havenâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t cooked this, I know enough about cooking to predict how this would end. in tragedy.

Dobson is slamming a person whom he calls a & quotFrenchman, & quot when that so-called & quotFrenchman & quot hails from Brussels, Belgium. Sort of like calling this recipe rooster with wine, yes?

This is fine if you have all the ingredients on hand and want to make something quick for two. But I agree with the other reviewers. Please change the name. Don & # x27t make an everyday slop dinner - in the microwave no less - and give it the same name as one of the most sublime French culinary creations.

Although, admittedly, I did not make this dish and don & # x27t intend to due to the use of the microwave (agreeing with most who reviewed this one), I did find it odd that the Dobson fellow had so much negativity directed toward the French fellow when all the French fellow did was to say what just about everyone else (Americans) had to say: this dish shouldn & # x27t be cooked with a microwave. I think Dobsonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s real problem is with the foreigner and he should keep his comments limited to the discussion of this recipe, rather than the so-called technological advances of America. Yes, I am American. and No, I don’t like the idea of ​​microwave cooking for most dishes. I & # x27m with Dallas, New York and the Frenchman on this one.

It sounded too quick to come close to this classic French feed. but if its fast chicken your looking for, try the Colonel. Delete this recipe. Or send it to Readers Digest.

All right. I tried this recipe. hmmm. not so great. BUT. It did make a decent Tom Kah Gai later with the addition of vegetables, coconut milk and red curry paste.

I am for changing the name. When I go to this sight for a classic recipe, I expect to see the classic recipe. Not that I won & # x27t try variations, its just that the title should indicate this.

I notice that those who dislike this recipe had not actually tried it, which seems silly. It seems to be an adaptation of a Barbara Kafka version, which she diplomatically calls something like Chicken in Red Wine. Coq au Vin it may not be, but itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s vastly better than the same-prep-time alternative-- heating up a frozen dinner or ordering out. I cooked the Kafka version the other night, and it was on the table in half an hour, along with a risotto, home-made bread and a garden salad. Few Luddite food snobs ate as well that night, in my opinion.

wow. people are really emotional about this. Maybe they should just change the name. it probably tastes good-- just not like coq au vin. who cares? If this is a palatable microwave dish, I don & # x27t see why the name should make any difference. Make it, and find out. As of yet, I see no well-founded complaints.

I wouldn & # x27t make this recipe. A better choice if you & # x27re looking for a & quotshortcut & quot is to follow a standard, traditional coq au vin recipe but use rock cornish game hen in place of the rooster. Everything is about the same but the hens need to simmer only half an hour or so - I cut them into four pieces and serve two per person. Turns out wonderful!

You don & # x27t have to live in Europe to realize that slow cooking on a real stove is essential for traditional dishes like Coq au Vin. What a terrible recipe this is! I do feel bad for anyone who & # x27s never had this delicious dish and decides to try this & quotversion & quot to see. Shame on you, Gourmet! Though we don & # x27t all have lots of time, we still want dishes that taste good we have come to expect better from you.

Horrid, how can one call that a & quotcoq au vin & quot

While I haven & # x27t a clue what this recipe would taste like, I think I can safely say I would rather eat this than be forced to spend an evening with the Frenchman who wrote the first review. If you don & # x27t appreciate American microwave technology, get off my cloud. Some of us want to live the dream, not just look at it from accross the Atlantic. Send us your food and weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll make it better. Personally, I commend the author of this recipe for his / her dedication to the advancement of cooking techniques.

I donâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t know how dare you call this recipe a gourmet.I donâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t think that microwave should be used in cooking at all.This recipe is just a disgrace !! You should just go back to college and study again because you forgot what cooking was all about.Both as a cook and french, I & # x27m very surprised (to not say more) to find this kind of recipe in your site.Letâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s hope youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll make better in the future?

This traditional dish does not deserve the treatment provided at this recipe. Follow a classical recipe - take your time, use good pork fat back, spend your money on good bottle of burgundy, peel baby onions one by one, marinate it overnight, thicken the sauce with beurre manier. Yes, use a good free range chicken instead of an old cock - but please don’t use this degenerated microwave recipe - call it anything else - but not a coq au vin. Note for those even more orthodox than me - you may call my version & quotpoulet au vin & quot. But - done the right way - IT WILL TASTE LIKE HEAVEN!

Come on Gourmet, get your act together. A microwave?

How could you not have a traditional recipe for coq au vin in your files? Who has ever heard of a microwavable coq au vin, who would want to even try this recipe?


Try this Coq au Vin recipe. When you put it on the table, pronounce it & # 8217s name with confidence: / Coke-O-va / The & # 8220va & # 8221 is like VAN, but without the N. I guess that & # 8217s the upside-down & # 8220e & # 8221 ?, but I don & # 8217t know how to do that on a keyboard.

Anyway, light some candles, pour some wine, and kiss your sweetheart & # 8230 or clink glasses with your best friend & # 8230 whatever. The point is: make it, eat it, and you & # 8217ll be hooked like I was. Coq au vin has deep flavors that come together slowly and simply.


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